; Carinata: Economics of a biofuel feedstock and producer constraints to increased adoption in Alabama. | Conferences | AgRisk Library

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Conference Name Carinata: Economics of a biofuel feedstock and producer constraints to increased adoption in Alabama.

Jessica Kelton

Summary

Carinata (Brassica carinata) is an oilseed crop grown as a cool season feedstock for renewable jet fuel production. Growth habits of carinata make this crop suitable for winter production across many areas of the Southeast, particularly in Alabama. There are many potential benefits to producers incorporating carinata into their current crop rotation including: increased revenue from a second crop, improved ground cover during winter months, and improved crop diversity without displacing any current acreage used for food production. However, as with any new crop, producer willingness to adopt the crop can be hindered for a number of reasons such as price points, lack of general agronomic understanding, and concern over long-term viability of the market. The Southeast Partnership for Advanced Renewables from Carinata (SPARC), led by the University of Florida, has worked to investigate the issues facing growers in southern states, increase number of acres planted to carinata, and ensure that carinata is a sustainable biofuel feedstock in the future. In Alabama, work continues to identify potential suitable varieties, disease management strategies, as well as yield potentials and profit margins for growers in the state.

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2019 Extension Risk Management Education National Conference